Seddülbahir Tabyası (Fort No. 3) and area

Armament: two 280 mm L/22 guns, two 260 mm L/22 guns, two 240 mm L/22 guns, two 37 mm anti-aircraft gun, six 87 mm L/24 guns with strengthened barrel


Fort Seddülbahir prior to WWI. Serious damage caused by Allied navy in 1915 and the fact that until mid 1990’s the fort was occupied by army resulted in irreparable changes in its structure. Out of eight gun emplacements there are only two resembling the original shape. The damage in the village beyond the fort was even worse. (L'Illustration)

Fort Seddülbahir. The carriage of a gun directly hit on February 25, 1915. Note the Ottoman inscription „Allah bizimledir” (“Allah is with us”), being doubtlessly a loan translation of the German motto „Gott mit uns”.

(CM - Piotr Nykiel's collection)

A gun (presumably 240//22 ) in Fort Seddülbahir blown up by the demolition party on February 26, 1915. The explosive was detonated in the breech. The explosion was so powerful that it not only blasted the breech (pieces of which still lie around within several dozen meters from the place) but also resulted in separation of the gun’s mount from the carriage. In the foreground the rubble of the ammunition store hit directly by one of the Allied ships.

(Piotr Nykiel's collection)

Fort Seddülbahir. Presumably the same gun as on the picture above. HMS Agamemnon in front of it. At the background (under steam) is most probably HMS Albion. Two “G” class destroyers and a single minesweeper can also be seen between the battleships.

(Visé, Paris No. 317 - Piotr Nykiel's collection)

Fort Seddülbahir on a picture taken by the British after April 25, 1915 landings. Note the gun breech blown up by the demolition party on February 26, 1915 (to the left), the ready to use old type ammunition (to the right) and the fort's NE gate in the center.

(Central News - Piotr Nykiel's collection)

A gun (presumably 280/22) in Fort Seddülbahir, the barrel of which was blown up by the demolition party on February 26, 1915. The photograph was taken in 1918.

(Piotr Nykiel's collection)

The lower castle in Seddülbahir.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

A gun blown up by the British demolition party on February 26, 1915 – now lying in the middle of lower castle’s courtyard.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

A piece of gun carriage separated when the gun was blown up – now lying in the Western corner of the lower castle’s courtyard.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Relicts of a 17th century tower and a 19th century gun emplacement in the Eastern part of Fort Seddülbahir.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Remnants of a gun on the gun emplacement shown on the picture above.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Piece of breech from a gun blown up by the English demolition party on February 26, 1915.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

An ammunition store in Fort Seddülbahir considerably converted, possibly after 1936.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

The remains of six guns from the battery of 87/24 guns with strengthened barrel in water close to the shore. The destruction of this battery on February 25, 1915 is confirmed by the sources of both fighting parties. However none of them mentions that probably the same day also a 90 cm searchlight became the victim of ships’ fire. The damaged shed in which it was hidden can be seen in the center of this photograph. HMS Agamemnon or Lord Nelson is to the right of the searchlight.

(Piotr Nykiel's collection)

The NE gate of Fort Seddülbahir (closed with wall after WWI). The mass grave of soldiers killed during the Allied naval bombardment on November 3, 1914 can be seen on its left side.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Seddülbahir fishing harbor – a place where Lt. F. H. Sandford’s demolition party has landed on February 27, 1915.The picture comes from a major set of photographs taken for sultan Abdülhamid II.

(Piotr Nykiel's collection)

Remains of 150/11,6 mortar battery in Seddülbahir (a few hundred meters from the fort) in 2004. Four ammunition stores made of steel rings and covered with stones (bonded with cement) and earth. The bricks in the foreground belong to the later building constructed by the Turkish army which occupied that place until recently. In the foreground, to the left a telephone or commanding post made in the same way as the ammunition stores.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

 

Back to Fortifications