Anadolu Hamidiye Tabyası (Fort No. 19)

Armament: two 355 mm L/35 guns, seven 240 mm L/35 guns


German emperor Wilhelm II (second from the left) in Fort Anadolu Hamidiye during his visit to Turkey in 1917. (Illustrierte Zeitung - Andrzej Danilewicz's collection)
Fort Anadolu Hamidiye in mid 1990's when it was still a military zone. A photograph looking SW.

1- Dardanos battery; 2 – Rumeli Mesudiye battery; 3 – Havuzlar Valley.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

A 355/35 gun in Fort Anadolu Hamidiye during WWI

(Internet)

A 240/35 gun in Fort Anadolu Hamidiye in 1920's or later.

(Internet)

Ammunition stores and gun emplacements of Fort Anadolu Hamidiye in 1922.

(Piotr Nykiel's collection)

A 355/35 gun in Fort Anadolu Hamidiye with the barrel blown up soon after WWI by the British occupation forces.

(Piotr Nykiel's collection)

Anadolu Hamidiye's rangefinder dismantled by the British soon after WWI.

(Piotr Nykiel's collection)

A 355/35 gun from Fort Çimenlik moved to Fort Anadolu Hamidiye in October 1917.


(A drawing from collection of the Çanakkale Naval Museum)

Cemetery of Turkish and German artilleryman killed on 18th March 1915 in fort Anadolu Hamidiye.

(A drawing from collection of the Çanakkale Naval Museum)

Fort Anadolu Hamidiye has been abandoned by the army recently but still remains closed for public. The pictures showed  below were taken in September 2011 and are probably the first photographs taken in this fort after WWI.

Left (SE) flank of Fort Anadolu Hamidiye

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Right (NW) flank of Fort Anadolu Hamidiye

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Central gun emplacement of Fort Anadolu Hamidiye

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Left flank of Fort Anadolu Hamidiye. Concrete walls in front of ammunition stores were erected after WWII.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Right flank of Fort Anadolu Hamidiye. Concrete walls in front of ammunition stores were erected after WWII.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Carriage of a 240/35 gun on one of the emplacements of the fort’s right flank. The stairs leading to the fort’s parapet were built after WWII.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Remains of a 400 mm gun which was deployed in Fort Anadolu Hamidiye and exploded during their first trials in March / April 1886. The 355/35 gun moved from Fort Çimenlik was probably deployed at this emplacement, as both 355 and 400 mm Krupp guns had the same carriage rotation axis.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Carriage rotation axis of a 355/35 gun.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Breechblock of a 400 mm gun (most probably the one that was deployed in Fort Anadolu Hamidiye). Now in collection of Naval Museum in Çanakkale. Note the tughra of Sultan Abdülaziz.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

One of two ammunition stores that had the endowment inscriptions over the entrance. Unfortunately none of them was preserved but taking into consideration some of characteristic structural features we may presume that Fort Anadolu Hamidiye was designed by the same architect as Fort Orhaniye.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

The other ammunition store with the destroyed endowment inscription over its entrance.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Some examples of various interiors of ammunition stores in Fort Anadolu Hamidiye.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)
(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)
(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)
(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

One of the gun emplacements on the left flank of Fort Anadolu Hamidiye with remains of a 240/35 gun carriage hidden in the scrub.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Some oother examples of the ammunition store's interiors.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

View from the parapet of Fort Anadolu Hamidite towards the Southern entrance to the Dardanelles. Gallipoli Peninsula on the right, Cape Kepez on the left.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

Fort Anadolu Hamidiye seen from the sea.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

The present shape of the cemetery of Turkish artillerymen from Fort Anadolu Hamidiye killed on 18th March 1915. The German graves were moved after WWI to the German Naval Cemetery at Nara.

(Photo: Piotr Nykiel)

 

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